Medal Winners modified 8.26.13
Emory Classics

Emory Classics

The civilization and cultural achievements of ancient Greece and Rome continue to influence our values, the way we think, and the questions we ask. They represent some of our deepest cultural roots and stand at the core of a liberal arts education.

Emory Classics boasts an energetic, internationally respected team of scholars devoted to undergraduate teaching, and to fostering close teacher/student relationships and personalized small-class experience. Since we have no graduate program, all our classes are taught by regular faculty, even at the elementary level. We offer students an opportunity to study the languages, literature, culture, and influence of classical antiquity. General courses include such topics as classical mythology, law, religion, women in antiquity, and Greek and Roman literature in translation. Most of these courses have no prerequisites, and several fulfill the distribution requirements of the College.

For students interested in Greek or Latin, language instruction is offered at all levels, from elementary to the most advanced, both in a classroom setting and in individual instruction. The department offers several majors and two minors; joint majors are also possible with other departments. In addition, for students who wish to design their own interdisciplinary course of study, the Department of Classics cooperates with several other departments to offer a major in Ancient Mediterranean Studies.

For further information, contact the chair of Classics, Louise Pratt, at lpratt@emory.edu, or the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Katrina Dickson, at kdickso@emory.edu.

Classics Office

The Department of Classics is located on the second floor of Candler Library (#110 on the map) on the campus of Emory University. Our campus address is 221F Candler Library, 550 Asbury Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322. The Departmental Office is open between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Phone
404.727.7592

Fax
404.727.0223

E-mail
jblack2@emory.edu

Our majors

CLASSICS

The most comprehensive of our majors, the Classics major requires study of both Greek and Latin languages, as well as courses in classical religion, archaeology, literature, politics, history, and philosophy. This should be the choice of those who seek to go to graduate school in Classics and of other students who are particularly interested in the language and literature of both ancient Greece and Rome.

Classics Major:

  • Greek and Latin: At least four 3 or 4 credit hour courses in one language AND at least two 3 or 4 credit hour courses in the other language beyond the elementary level.
  • At least two 3 or 4 credit hour Classics courses (i.e. courses in the Classics Department not designated as Greek or Latin language courses).
  • At least two 3 or 4 credit hour courses that focus on ancient Greece and/or Rome offered by or cross-listed with other departments including, but not limited to, Art History, History, and Philosophy.

Classics minor: There is no pure Classics minor at Emory. See Classical Civilization, Greek or Latin.

Learning Goals:

  1. Students will demonstrate advanced competence in one of the classical languages.
  2. Students will demonstrate at least intermediate competence in a second classical language.
  3. Students will know how to read and interpret ancient Greek and Roman texts and artifacts and be able to communicate this in writing, by constructing a logical argument using primary evidence taken from antiquity in clear and grammatical prose.
  4. Students will be able to analyze and critically evaluate another person's argument(s) about the ancient world.

Degree Checklist for Classics Majors

 

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION

This major is designed for students with broad interests in the classical world. Students pursuing this major study many different aspects of classical culture, including literature, art and archaeology, history, philosophy, and religion. This major provides students with a strong, general liberal arts education appropriate to many pursuits after college, including law, medicine, business, writing, and publishing.

Classical Civilization Major:

A minimum of 36 hours in Classics, Greek or Latin OR approved realted fields, which must include:

  • At least two Classics courses at the 100 level (i.e. courses in the Classics Department not designated as Greek or Latin language courses).
  • At least three 3 or 4 hour credit hour Classics courses at the 200 level or above.
  • At least two 3 or 4 credit hour courses on ancient Greece and/or Rome offered by or cross-listed with other departments including, but not limited to Art History, History, and Philosophy.
  • At least two additional 3 or 4 credit hour courses in Classics, Greek, or Latin or approved related fields.
  • Majors should consult closely with a faculty advisor in developing their course of study.



Classical Civilization Minor:

A minimum of 18 hours in Classics, Greek, or Latin OR approved related fields, which must include:

  • At least five 3 or 4 credit hour courses in Classics or courses on ancient Greece and/or Rome offered by or cross-listed with other departments including, but not limited to, Art History, History, and Philosophy.
  • At least three of the five courses taken must be at the 200 level or above.
  • Minors should consult closely with a faculty advisor in developing their field of study.

Learning Goals:

  1. Students will know how to read and interpret ancient Greek and Roman texts and artifacts and be able to communicate this in writing, by constructing a logical argument using primary evidence taken from antiquity in clear and grammatical prose.
  2. Students will be able to analyze and critically evaluate another person's argument(s) about the ancient world.
  3. Students will have a broad knowledge of the classical world.

 

Degree Checklist for Classical Civilization Majors

Degree Checklist for Classical Civilization Minors

GREEK OR LATIN

Greek or Latin: Majors and minors in Greek or in Latin are designed for students who want to make one of the two classical languages their area of expertise. Students pursue these majors for many different reasons. While some wish to become teachers themselves, many more are pre-professional students seeking the well-roundedness and intellectual breadth that comes from serious study of the humanities. Both Greek and Latin majors enjoy studying literature and culture in the kind of detail only possible in the original language.

Greek Major OR Latin Major:

  • At least five 3 or 4 credit hour courses in the target language beyond the elementary level.
  • At least two 3 or 4 credit hour Classics courses (i.e. courses in the Classics Department not designated as Greek or Latin language courses).

At least two 3 or 4 credit hour courses that focus on ancient Greece and/or Rome offered by or cross-listed with other departments including, but not limited to, Art History, History, and Philosphy.


Greek Minor or Latin Minor:

  • At least four 3 or 4 credit hour courses in the target language beyond the elementary level.

Learning Goals (Greek):

  1. Students will demonstrate advanced competence in Greek.
  2. Students will know how to read and interpret ancient Greek (and whenever possible Roman) texts and artifacts and be able to communicate this in writing, by constructing a logical argument using primary evidence taken from antiquity in clear and grammatical prose.
  3. Students will be able to analyze and critically evaluate another person's argument(s) about the ancient world.

Learning Goals (Latin):

  1. Students will demonstrate advanced competence in Latin.
  2. Students will know how to read and interpret Roman (and whenever possible Greek) texts and artifacts and be able to communicate this in writing, by constructing a logical argument using primary evidence taken from antiquity in clear and grammatical prose.
  3. Students will be able to analyze and critically evaluate another person's argument(s) about the ancient world.

 

Degree Checklist for Greek Majors

Degree Checklist for Greek Minors

Degree Checklist for Latin Majors

Degree Checklist for Latin Minors

JOINT MAJORS

Classics offers joint majors with English, History, Philosophy, and Religion for students with strong interests in more than one area.

Classics/English Major:

  • At least six 3 or 4 credit hour courses in English.
  • At least five 3 or 4 credit hour courses either in ancient Greek or in Latin (but not a combination of the two).
  • At least two 3 or 4 credit hour courses in Classics or courses that focus on Art History, History, or Philosophy of ancient Greece and/or Rome offered by or cross-listed with other departments.

At least 4 credit hours of independent study/directed reading for the writing of a senior thesis.

Classics/History Major:

  • At least six 3 or 4 credit hour courses in History.
  • At least five 3 or 4 credit hour courses either in ancient Greek or Latin
  • At least one 3 or 4 credit hour courses in Classics or one 3 or 4 hour course that focus on the Art History, History, History, or Philosophy of ancient Greece and/or Rome offered by or cross-listed with other departments.

At least 4 credit hours (typically one 4 hour course) of independent study/directed reading for the writing of a senior thesis.



Classics/Philosophy Major:

A mimimum of 45 hours in Classics (including Greek and Latin) and Philosophy courses including:

  • 5 courses in either Greek or Latin (but not a combination of the two).
  • 6 course in Philosophy including:
    • Philosophy 110
    • Philosophy 200
    • Philosophy 202
    • 3 Philosophy electives of which at least 2 must be at the 300 level or above.
  • Additional credit hours required for the major beyond the required courses may be taken in Classics (including Greek and Latin), Philosophy, or other courses that focus on Art History, History, or Philosophy of ancient Greece and/or Rome offered by or cross-listed with other departments.

 



Classical Civilization/Religion:

  • EITHER two 3 or 4 credt hour courses in Greek or Latin (but not a combination of the two), OR Classics 102
    (4 hours) and Classics 214 (3 hours).
  • Religion 300 (4 hours), Religion 490W (4 hours) AND one tradition-specific course with approval of religion adviser.
  • At least nine addtional 3 or 4 credit hours courses in Religion and Classics, including:
    • At least four 3 or 4 credit hour courses in Classics, of which at least two courses must be the 200 hundred level or higher.
    • At least three 3 or 4 credit hour courses in Religion, or which at least two courses must be at the 300 hundred level or higher.




Degree Checklist for Classics-English Joint Majors

Degree Checklist for Classics-History Joint Majors

Degree Checklist for Classics-Philosophy Joint Majors

Degree Checklist for Classical Civilization-Religion Joint Majors



To register for majors or minors: A student should go to the Department of Classics office (221F Candler Library) and ask for the form to register as a major or minor. Joint majors should register with both departments and ideally should seek advisors in both departments.

Advising: A student may ask any faculty member in the Department of Classics to serve as academic advisor. All students majoring or minoring in the department will have an advisor either chosen by them or assigned to them.

Per college requirements, courses that are being taken for general education requirements or toward a major or minor must be taken for a letter grade.

 

Classics Prizes:

The Department annually awards prizes to the best students in Classics.

The McCord Latin Prize is named for H. Y. (Henry Young) McCord (d. 1943) who was a "friend and benefactor" of the University and founder of the McCord-Stewart Company, grocery wholesalers in Atlanta. Three of his four sons were also affiliated with the school: H. Y. McCord, Jr. ('09) was a member and sometime secretary of the Emory Board of Trustees; J. R. McCord was professor of obstetrics at Emory Medical School; Jeff D. (Jefferson Davis) McCord ('16) was a professor and the first athletic director at Emory.

Winners of the prize typically receive a Latin or Greek dictionary or comparable reference work. Originally, the prizes consisted of a medal such as the one below, awarded to Hansell Baugh in 1922.

The Reppard Greek Prize is named for R. B. Reppard (Robert B.) of Savannah, Ga., a wealthy lumber manufacturer, dealer, and shipper. According to The Cyclopedia of Georgia (1906) Reppard served on the Emory Board of Trustees, was a prominent member of the Methodist church, was Chilean consul in Savannah, longtime president of the Georgia Sunday School Association, and president of the Savannah Poet Society.

Until recently, winners of this prize typically received a Latin or Greek dictionary or comparable reference work. As with the McCord Prize, it originally consisted of a medal like that below - the medal won by
John Fraser Hart 43C, the last recorded winner of the original Reppard prize. For a partial list of prize winners click here.

 

The Department Classics Prize is given on an occasional basis to especially worthy students, typically to help defray the cost of Classics-related summer travel or study. Students are encouraged to apply directly to the department for this prize.

CAMWS Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies: The department selects students each year for the Classical Association of the Midwest and South's (CAMWS) Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies Awards. This prize typically goes to promising underclassmen and consists of a year's membership in CAMWS and subscription to The Classical Journal.

The Emory College Language Center's (ECLC) Excellence in Language Studies Awards: The Department nominates an outstanding student each year for these awards, one in Latin, one in Ancient Greek.

Top | Home | Email

 

 
Course%20Checklist%20for%20Latin%20Majors